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Setting Intentions Is Key To Your Success

Setting Intentions Is Key To Your Success

I talk to countless people about their professional lives and I cannot tell you how many times I have heard someone tell me, “Oh, I just kind of fell into this job.” Those same people who tell me this, often, follow it up later by mentioning just how stressed out they are all the time. Does this sound familiar as it relates to your job, hobby, or marketing art?

Starting Out

We all know the story. We fall into one job right after college, get some experience in that role, and realize we don’t really like that job. So, we use that experience to find another job in that field at another organization in hopes that it will be different this time, but we end up unhappy there too. This cycle continues until suddenly five, ten, or twenty years have gone by and we are well into a career we didn’t even want to begin with!

We spend one third of our lives at work! If you are spending one-third of your life doing something you just fell into and don’t even want to do, it is no wonder you are stressed out all the time. Worse, chances are that you are bringing that stress home with you to your family and friends. All of this stress because we fell into this job. That is why setting intentions in your life and career is important.

Setting Intentions

When I ask people what their intentions are in their careers, many people have one: I need to earn more money. While more money can be an intention, the bottom line is that money cannot buy peace of mind. A study was done recently that says that after you reach about $75000 a year in salary, an increase in your annual salary doesn’t make a significant difference in your happiness (look it up!).

Yes, money can buy you a massage and food on the table. That is great. However, that partner of your dreams, that sense of joy and happiness for life? Money is never going to buy you the things that fuel your soul. You have to go beyond just the money intention.

Create A Plan

Setting intentions is incredibly important, especially at the beginning of the year. Take it one step at a time. Start out by waking up in the morning and setting your daily or weekly intention. Monthly, quarterly, annual – take a look at what you want to get from this life and set your life’s intention.

I invite you to try a different approach and focus on your career intentions. Money may be a part of your intentions. Go beyond that. Consider how you want your career to make you feel. What do you want to have? Who do you want to work with? What is the real intention that will drive your decisions?

When you create that intention, it creates a guiding beacon of light on your path. Use that intention. Ask yourself if that new job offer or relationship is going to lead you to the intention you have set in your life or career. If the answer is yes, go for it and give it everything you’ve got! If the answer is no, abandon ship! Not doing so is how we “fell into” jobs before.

Carlee Myers Headshot - Getting To The Root Of ProcrastinationCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


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New Year’s Resolutions (Revisited)

New Year’s Resolutions (Revisited)

Can you believe that another year has passed by? Now that we have all had a happy holiday season, are getting into the new year’s groove, and planning strategies for marketing art, I want to give you a gift and tell you the number one reason so many of us just can’t seem to stick to New Year’s resolutions.

 

Resolution vs Motivation

You know the story. You tell yourself that you’re going to lose 30 pounds this year. Then the year passes you by and those gym shoes you bought in January haven’t left your closet since February. Whatever the resolution was for you, we have all been there. You probably spend every December wondering why you weren’t able to follow through on the goals you set for yourself.

It turns out that the problem isn’t with the New Year’s resolution itself. The number one reason we do not follow through with our New Year’s resolution has more to do with the reason we are trying to pursue the resolution to begin with.

We may tell ourselves that we want to lose 30 pounds this year because we want to be healthy. That is not what we care about at the end of the day. What we want is to be able to keep up with our friends on their Saturday morning hikes. We want to feel confident when we go to the beach in a swimsuit.

New Year, New Business?

Many aspiring entrepreneurs go into the New Year wanting to start a company. They say they want to create this business for money or to help people. Those reasons might be a part of your motivation for starting this business. There is more to it most of the time. Everyone needs money or wants to help people. There is a bigger motivation that is driving your decision to become an business owner. It may be that you want to buy your first house or you want the freedom to travel.

While you may feel that motivations like wanting to buy a house appear selfish, the only way to stick to resolutions is get in touch with why we want the end result. When we know what that motivation is, we can find the drive to stick to our goals this year and all the years to come.

Finding your motivation is a powerful way to follow through with your New Year’s resolutions. I know that achieving the things you want in the new year is far from easy. It is hard! It is doable.

Carlee Myers Headshot - Getting To The Root Of ProcrastinationCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


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Why You Need To Take Time For Yourself

Why You Need To Take Time For Yourself

Lately, I have had a lot of conversations with people that are in transition. These are people who are either looking to transition from their current full time role into a new job, creating a new business, or marketing art. They are people who have been laid off by huge companies and trying to reinvent themselves in their career. Maybe you can relate.

 

Employer Expectations

What’s interesting about the people I have met is that many of them are working in their current position beyond the traditional 9 to 5 schedule. Nowadays, it is the expectation among employers that we will be there on our nights and weekends, ready and on call for any little problem that arises. The people I have met who have recently been laid off are working around the clock trying to find a new way to make ends meet.

Every day, we fall into the cycle of overworking ourselves in positions or situations that we never wanted to begin with. How do we find the time to get out of the job we accepted just because we needed to escape the financial hole we were in? How do we break the pattern of working all the time so that we can build the career we want for ourselves?

Why You Need To Take Time For Yourself

The obvious answer I hear a lot is time management; however, I think there is more to the story. I think a lot of people know how to manage their time. If all you needed to do was create more time in your day, you could. What stops so many of us from creating the time we need to create the career we want is the underlying fear that we are being selfish. We can be so afraid that spending that time on ourselves is selfish when we have families and day jobs that need our attention. How do you make that time commitment to transitioning to a more fulfilling career without feeling frivolous or selfish?

One of the main things that I recommend is to think about the value you bring to the table. Think about the importance of this career transition in your life. If you do not make this career change, what will happen and how will you feel? If you make this change, how will you feel then? What does this career change mean to you?

I met a woman recently who was so in love with the work she does that she wants to work in her position at her organization for the rest of her life. Her career is focused on a spiritually driven purpose that she discovered within herself. Imagine how devastated she would feel had she not taken the time for herself to find it. It is important not only to think about the value you can give to society when your work truly aligns with your purpose, but also to think about the consequences of not moving forward. When you are in touch with your value and the potential you have, you reinvigorate a sense of motivation.

You Have Value

Remembering your value helps you realize why you are worthy of taking ten minutes a day for your goals. Create some time for your job search or your business each day. The value you will see in yourself will grow. The more value you place on yourself, the more you will feel worthy of using that extra time for your future. That way, if anyone tries to call you out on taking a little time for yourself, you can confidently look the in the eye and say, “It’s only a few minutes. I am doing the world a favor by pursuing my calling and helping others with my heart-centered action.” The talents you have to share with the world are valuable to everyone, use them wisely.

Carlee Myers Headshot - Getting To The Root Of ProcrastinationCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


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Searching For Your One True Calling

Searching For Your One True Calling

I often see people put an overwhelming amount of pressure on themselves, struggling to answer one question: What is my one true calling? I talk with people who feel lost in the confusion around finding that perfect job, business idea, or strategy for marketing art that is going to finally make them happy and excited each day.

It’s All Relative

We all have had that internal conversation with ourselves growing up about whether we should be an accountant or a fireman or any other job. Yet, as I was talking to my partner about a client, we got on the subject of soulmates. That’s when it hit me. So many of us have this “finding your calling” thing all wrong. Finding your one true calling, just like finding your one true soulmate, is not how real life works.

We seem to have these beliefs that there’s this one true position or job out there for us to find in order to feel satisfied. There’s one true person for us to fall in love with. We all have that urge inside of us to seek out the fairy tale ending where you find “the one.”  The story ends happily ever after. However, I am a firm believer that we don’t just have one soulmate forever or one perfect job forever. I believe that you will find that you have a different soulmate or soul-career for different parts of your life.

In the span of your love life, you may have had your high school sweetheart and whirlwind college romance. In your professional life, you might have had your high school babysitting job, first college internship, and the entry-level position right after graduating. All of the different jobs you had helped you learn more about yourself, why you are on this planet, and about your past relationships. I am not a relationship expert, so I won’t give out any advice on your love life. However, when it comes to your professional life, your task is not to find your one true calling. Your only task is to find your calling for who you are at this moment. To do that, look for your purpose.

Find Your Purpose, Not Your Calling

Your purpose and your calling often get used interchangeably, but I believe there is an important distinction. A calling is a job, a purpose is the reason you are on this earth. Your calling will change because it is a specific position, but your purpose is vague and will likely remain the same.

For instance, my purpose is helping others. It led me to my current calling, starting the Stress Less Company and helping hundreds of people find work that makes them happy. Your purpose may be using math to solve the world’s problems. This could lead to a calling of being a NASA scientist or a financial analyst. The possibilities that exist within your purpose are endless.

Your Challenge

I challenge you to take the pressure of finding one true calling off of your shoulders. Instead, think about your purpose. Think about what traits and skills you uniquely have that can contribute something to the world. Think about why you are on this earth. Approach your career with your purpose in mind. All of the opportunities you have will lay themselves out in front of you for you to choose.

Your choice is not predestined for you. You have free will to choose one calling today and another calling two years from now. We each have a path ahead of us that is made up of different callings and that is okay. It is okay if we shift to calling after calling, it’s okay if we stay in one calling for years. What isn’t okay is settling for a calling that goes against your purpose. That’s why you’re here on this earth, after all.

Carlee Myers Headshot - Getting To The Root Of ProcrastinationCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


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Getting To The Root Of Procrastination

Getting To The Root Of Procrastination

Why is getting to the root of procrastination so challenging? Why don’t we do those important things that need to get done? You know you have to do something but somehow it still doesn’t get done – like developing a strategy for marketing art. There are many reasons why we don’t do what really needs to get done. One of the key reasons that prevents us from taking action is that we don’t really know our ‘why.’

Why “Why?”

Why is this task so important to us? Mel Robbins, a prominent coach in the personal development world, has established that the reason that we don’t do things is because we don’t really know why we’re doing them to begin with. We might know of many ‘why’s’ handed down to us by parents, bosses, and society (such as money, status, and the fancy car), but we don’t know our own truest ‘why’.

Another key factor that influences getting to the root of procrastination is what creates our why – our core desired feeling. What is the core desired feeling that you want to feel on a daily basis? How does this core desired feeling affect your why? I spoke to a client this morning whose core desired feeling is ‘transcendental.’ In this instance, her why was about working on herself so that she can transcend and make a bigger difference to society through her writing.

When writing every day, getting into the flow and finishing a novel wasn’t enough. She had to write in her personal journal in order to understand herself so that she had something to transcend from. Her core desired feeling helped her create her why, which was vital for her to move forward with her goals.

Struggling with procrastination?

Next time you’re avoiding something, write down your main intention for the day. What do you want to accomplish or work on? Then write down three reasons why this task or project is important to you. You’ll move forward on this project or task because you’re connected to the ‘why.’

Carlee Myers Headshot - Getting To The Root Of ProcrastinationCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


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The Number 1 Activity To Get To The Next Phase Of Your Career

The Number 1 Activity To Get To The Next Phase Of Your Career

The number 1 activity to get to the next phase of your career is networking. This ultimately boils down to connections and relationships. I am sure you’ve heard people say, ‘It’s all in who you know.’ Whether you want to get into an exclusive event or party, get that next job, or get that discount at a store, it’s all in who you know. This is why networking is important for  joint venture partners, clients, and marketing art.

 

About Networking

Networking is usually an activity of going to an event, repeatedly giving your elevator pitch, and giving out your business cards. There is more to networking than just this! It is really about creating deep and meaningful connections with people we wouldn’t have necessarily met in an everyday context. The point of networking is to get us to that next phase of our career, which might be a promotion or to further build our business.

Networking is this vital tool that we often use incorrectly. A lot of the time, I’ve noticed that people go to events hoping to share what they do and see what they can get from as many people as possible. Unfortunately, this is not how deep and meaningful connections work. Establishing deep and meaningful connections will likely get you recommendations. Whereas with brief encounters, you’ll be lucky if anyone will remember or recommend you. Nobody likes receiving a sales pitch out of context. It reeks of a desperation mind set.

Recommendations

To get you into the next phase of your career, practice active listening. When you get to a networking event, enable the next person to have a platform to share more about themselves. Everyone is eager to speak about what they offer. You will stand out if you offer yourself as an active listener in networking spaces. Gather key information that will tell you if there is some synergy between the other person and yourself. Do they have a connection somewhere you’ve applied? Are they desperately in need of your services? Remember, you can guide the conversation based on the questions you ask!

To the next phase of your career:

  1. Get into different spaces with different people.
  2. Listen actively. You can do this by asking questions and seeing how you can help someone else. At the end of the day, the people you genuinely connect with will be more than willing to help you make the next move in your career.

Carlee Myers HeadshotCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


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A Creative Way To Reconnect To Your Job

A Creative Way To Reconnect To Your Job

More and more people are joining the gig economy. That means developing a creative practice, marketing art, and working a regular job. 70% of the US population feel disengaged at work or they hate their jobs. If you’re part of this 70%, try this exercise. Reconnect to your job. Learn why you started working where you work in the first place. This exercise will completely change the way you view your job and the career path that you’re on. Give it a go!

Write A Letter To Your Employer

Tell them why you love them and why you’re grateful for having them in your life. This exercise might sound like a combination of cringe-worthy craziness, but it is highly effective in reminding you why you took the job in the first place. You don’t have to give the letter to your employer, unless you want to. Ultimately this exercise is for you! Here’s a suggestion on how to start your letter:

‘Dear [insert organization], I am so so grateful that day in and day out you pay for my bills…

At the end of the day this job, that you might currently loathe, is part of your journey. By writing this letter you are partaking in a gesture of acknowledging this in a way other than complaining about how much you hate your job.

When you first start a job, you may feel a sense of excitement, like you’re falling in love. It’s easy to see why you’re destined for this job in the bigger scheme of things. It might be a stepping stone for you to save more money or go back to school. It might be an entry level position for you to work your way up the ladder. Yet, as time goes by, it’s easy to see less and less of the bigger picture that you had envisioned for yourself.

Shift Your Perspective

What this exercise does is shift your perspective of where you’re at right now in your job. It can be written as a farewell letter. It can be written as a way to renew your commitment with your employer and/or the company you work for. It’s an effective way to gain resilience and get perspective on what your next move is.

Carlee Myers HeadshotCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


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Two Tools You Can Use To Be More Productive

Two Tools You Can Use To Be More Productive

Productivity is activity that positively influences the trajectory of your life whether at home, work, or with personal projects like marketing art. I decided it was time to give you two tools you can use to be more productive, especially considering the many conversations surrounding the age old, “Why don’t I ever get anything done?” or “How the hell did I even get here (without achieving what I set out to achieve)?” 

5 Second Rule

The first tool was developed by Mel Robbins: The ‘5 Second Rule.’ This rule helps you launch into whatever task you need to get done and prevent procrastination. The idea is to count backwards from 5 and move yourself physically towards achieving the task. For example, if you’re struggling to get out of bed, count down from 5 to 1 and physically get yourself out of bed. Or, if you remember something that needs to be done, count down from 5 to 1 and write that task down on your to-do list. The ‘5 Second Rule’ is about helping you make that first move towards being more productive. It creates that forward momentum for yourself.

The Tomato Timer

‘The Tomato Timer’ is another great tool to help you be your most productive self. Traditionally, this tool is about setting a 20 minute timer where zero distractions are allowed. Yep, this means no phone, no Facebook, no cat videos. This means no distractions until you’ve completed the task at hand or the timer has hit 20 minutes. At the end of the 20 minutes, you get a 5 minute break to do whatever you want or need to do and then you go back to 20 minutes of focused work.

I suggest that you get a little more creative with your tomato timer. For example, I had a really long spreadsheet to update – something like 300 rows! So I made an internal agreement with myself. Do 20 lines at a time and take a short break to look at my phone, 20 lines, short break, 20 lines, SHORT break … you get the idea.

For those of you who have lunch breaks, the tomato timer is perfect for you. One day I dedicated 40 minutes of my lunch break to my own personal tasks. The agreement that I created with myself was that if I completed these 40 minutes, I get to take a 20 minute walk.

The tomato timer helps you manage your time because you know you need to complete something within the time allocated. The breaks give you space to fill your time with a sense of reward for your focus. There are even Tomato Timer Apps out there that you can use to assist you! This tool is really helpful during afternoon sluggishness where you end up mindlessly scrolling through Facebook (or mindlessly clicking through windows).

Carlee Myers HeadshotCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


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Researching Calls For Artists

Researching Calls For Artists

Researching calls for artists is an important component of your strategy for marketing art. It is challenging to figure out where to start. Sometimes this can feel overwhelming. To help build your confidence, break down your research into small actionable steps.

Bring The Opportunities To You

Set up Google Alerts for your area. Use this search string: “call for artists” + location. You may also want to include + medium.

For example: “call for artists” + Cleveland + painting

Sign up for niche call for artists platforms. Find them by searching for: “calls for artists” + medium or + style or + relevant topic. Most niche platforms will allow you to narrow your search results to your preferred locations once you sign up.

For example: “calls for artists” + sculpture + “public art” = Americans for the Arts Public Arts Listings

Sign up for newsletters from your area Arts Council and state Arts Commission. These will generally include calls for artists collected from local non-profits.

Dig Deeper For Hidden Gems

Sometimes, when you find a call for artists posted publicly, it has already been filled. It’s important to try to get in front of the process not only to make sure you have to to apply, but also in order to have enough time to create the work or have enough inventory available.

Whenever you find a recurring opportunity, add it to your own spreadsheet. Include the columns: Opportunity, location, deadline, contact information / URL, and a short description. Start checking for the yearly deadline and new information at least six months ahead.

Review call for artists content marketing platforms which offer a range of opportunities, such as Side Arts (our specialty is vetted and trusted call for artists with significant track records of success for artists), Zapplication (juried calls), and Art Fair Insiders (art fair specialists).

Check out their archives and forum sections for information and reviews of calls for artists which align with your goals and interests.

Side Arts only promotes new, active calls for artists – no duplicates.

  • Use the Active category to see current listings.
  • Use the Expired category to see listings which have passed their deadline. Find organizations which offer calls for artists in your area. They may be offering an opportunity, but not promoting it broadly.
  • Use the other categories to refine your search by location, type of call, award amount, and so on.

Researching Calls For Artists Conclusion

Try using free resources to bring the opportunities to your inbox. Join local arts listservs. Create a spreadsheet. Dedicate time once every three months (set up a Google Reminder) to do original research. Make it a SMART goal to add at least three opportunities to your list every month.


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Call For Artists Providers

Call For Artists Providers

Side Arts provides promotion content marketing for a range of call for artists providers and business types. The most common include art organizations, galleries, event promoters, private businesses, local governments, educational institutes, and museums.

Call For Artists Providers

In order of frequency, these are the types of organizations which provide opportunities for visual artists and crafters:

  1. Galleries – Offer 4-10 exhibition opportunities per year. These are themed calls which can range from colors, shapes, social issues, medium, and styles. The benefit of showing with a gallery is being able to take advantage of their relationships with collectors.
  2. Non-profit art organizations – Offer 2-3 exhibition or competitions per year. The non-profits are typically local arts councils or focused on a specific medium, such as wood, ceramics, or fabric. Exhibition themes revolve around local history, public figures, and community affairs.
  3. Event promoters – Manage annual art fairs. These pay-to-participate events usually include the opportunity for juried prizes. Participation to be juried often costs extra.
  4. Residencies – Destinations for inspired art making which may include travel expenses, room and board, studio space, and guided support and experiences. Residencies may be juried or paid. 1) Juried: There are no costs except application fees. 2) Paid: The participant assumes all costs. These provide different levels of services on a fee-based and availability basis.
  5. Government institutions – Opportunities provided by city government or state arts commissions. These occur irregularly and are dependent on funding. Funding may come from the city, state, federal, or percent-for-art (one-half of one percent of construction cost for art projects). These are requests for proposals for public works – murals, sculptures, traffic box wraps, storm drain painting, bus stop installations, bicycle rack artwork, public bench artwork, and other installations.
  6. Publications – Magazines, both online and in print. Usually pay-to-participate and ongoing based on publication frequency.
  7. Studio tours – Community events where artist studios are open to the public. Run by a local arts council or an independent non-profit organization. Pay-to-participate. Although traffic is not guaranteed, online and print promotion may be offered. The primary benefit is having a reason to clean up and organize the studio annually.
  8. Higher education institutions – These are often residencies which take advantage of a broad range of facilities and services available at the institution as well as dormitory living space.
  9. Private businesses – Commissions from private businesses looking for branding and marketing support – typically murals or 2D artwork in private offices, hotels, and other real estate.

Call For Artists Benefits

Providing each of the above has positive and negative aspects. Make sure the fee structure, commissions, and terms of engagement are clearly defined. Know your legal rights. Give quantitative and qualitative data to back up why someone should participate.


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