General Archives - Page 3 of 5 - Side Arts

Getting To The Root Of Procrastination

Getting To The Root Of Procrastination

Why is getting to the root of procrastination so challenging? Why don’t we do those important things that need to get done? You know you have to do something but somehow it still doesn’t get done – like developing a strategy for marketing art. There are many reasons why we don’t do what really needs to get done. One of the key reasons that prevents us from taking action is that we don’t really know our ‘why.’

Why “Why?”

Why is this task so important to us? Mel Robbins, a prominent coach in the personal development world, has established that the reason that we don’t do things is because we don’t really know why we’re doing them to begin with. We might know of many ‘why’s’ handed down to us by parents, bosses, and society (such as money, status, and the fancy car), but we don’t know our own truest ‘why’.

Another key factor that influences getting to the root of procrastination is what creates our why – our core desired feeling. What is the core desired feeling that you want to feel on a daily basis? How does this core desired feeling affect your why? I spoke to a client this morning whose core desired feeling is ‘transcendental.’ In this instance, her why was about working on herself so that she can transcend and make a bigger difference to society through her writing.

When writing every day, getting into the flow and finishing a novel wasn’t enough. She had to write in her personal journal in order to understand herself so that she had something to transcend from. Her core desired feeling helped her create her why, which was vital for her to move forward with her goals.

Struggling with procrastination?

Next time you’re avoiding something, write down your main intention for the day. What do you want to accomplish or work on? Then write down three reasons why this task or project is important to you. You’ll move forward on this project or task because you’re connected to the ‘why.’

Carlee Myers Headshot - Getting To The Root Of ProcrastinationCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


...


The Number 1 Activity To Get To The Next Phase Of Your Career

The Number 1 Activity To Get To The Next Phase Of Your Career

The number 1 activity to get to the next phase of your career is networking. This ultimately boils down to connections and relationships. I am sure you’ve heard people say, ‘It’s all in who you know.’ Whether you want to get into an exclusive event or party, get that next job, or get that discount at a store, it’s all in who you know. This is why networking is important for  joint venture partners, clients, and marketing art.

 

About Networking

Networking is usually an activity of going to an event, repeatedly giving your elevator pitch, and giving out your business cards. There is more to networking than just this! It is really about creating deep and meaningful connections with people we wouldn’t have necessarily met in an everyday context. The point of networking is to get us to that next phase of our career, which might be a promotion or to further build our business.

Networking is this vital tool that we often use incorrectly. A lot of the time, I’ve noticed that people go to events hoping to share what they do and see what they can get from as many people as possible. Unfortunately, this is not how deep and meaningful connections work. Establishing deep and meaningful connections will likely get you recommendations. Whereas with brief encounters, you’ll be lucky if anyone will remember or recommend you. Nobody likes receiving a sales pitch out of context. It reeks of a desperation mind set.

Recommendations

To get you into the next phase of your career, practice active listening. When you get to a networking event, enable the next person to have a platform to share more about themselves. Everyone is eager to speak about what they offer. You will stand out if you offer yourself as an active listener in networking spaces. Gather key information that will tell you if there is some synergy between the other person and yourself. Do they have a connection somewhere you’ve applied? Are they desperately in need of your services? Remember, you can guide the conversation based on the questions you ask!

To the next phase of your career:

  1. Get into different spaces with different people.
  2. Listen actively. You can do this by asking questions and seeing how you can help someone else. At the end of the day, the people you genuinely connect with will be more than willing to help you make the next move in your career.

Carlee Myers HeadshotCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


...


A Creative Way To Reconnect To Your Job

A Creative Way To Reconnect To Your Job

More and more people are joining the gig economy. That means developing a creative practice, marketing art, and working a regular job. 70% of the US population feel disengaged at work or they hate their jobs. If you’re part of this 70%, try this exercise. Reconnect to your job. Learn why you started working where you work in the first place. This exercise will completely change the way you view your job and the career path that you’re on. Give it a go!

Write A Letter To Your Employer

Tell them why you love them and why you’re grateful for having them in your life. This exercise might sound like a combination of cringe-worthy craziness, but it is highly effective in reminding you why you took the job in the first place. You don’t have to give the letter to your employer, unless you want to. Ultimately this exercise is for you! Here’s a suggestion on how to start your letter:

‘Dear [insert organization], I am so so grateful that day in and day out you pay for my bills…

At the end of the day this job, that you might currently loathe, is part of your journey. By writing this letter you are partaking in a gesture of acknowledging this in a way other than complaining about how much you hate your job.

When you first start a job, you may feel a sense of excitement, like you’re falling in love. It’s easy to see why you’re destined for this job in the bigger scheme of things. It might be a stepping stone for you to save more money or go back to school. It might be an entry level position for you to work your way up the ladder. Yet, as time goes by, it’s easy to see less and less of the bigger picture that you had envisioned for yourself.

Shift Your Perspective

What this exercise does is shift your perspective of where you’re at right now in your job. It can be written as a farewell letter. It can be written as a way to renew your commitment with your employer and/or the company you work for. It’s an effective way to gain resilience and get perspective on what your next move is.

Carlee Myers HeadshotCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


...


Victoria Harrison [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Victoria Harrison [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Victoria Harrison is a new Side Arts Certified Member.

I believe art is central to society. It can change our world perceptions and how we understand each other. This transformative power of art motivated me to become a full time artist. In an age of accessible communication, images are being used in a way that before was not possible and there is an opportunity to exploit this. As a visual artist, I wish to seize the moment and, through artistic practice, move beyond current demands for daily, examined identities.

My practice focuses on the fragility and beauty of Nature. I mostly paint abstract landscapes, aiming to capture the delicate balance of our planet through my visualization of it. I feel this quality of the perception of Nature, particularly the play of light with colour, contains an important message today.

Victoria Harrison

I studied life drawing and painting and was a member of the Hesketh Hubbard Society and the Federation of British Artists (FBA). Drawing is the basis of my work along with traditional painting techniques with new ways to explore paint as a medium. My use of colour is instinctive. I study colour theory, very often deciding on the pallet and tones before starting a new piece.

I have exhibited throughout London, northern Spain, and the USA; carried out several art commissions; and have had my work published in books and catalogues. My pieces are in private collections and a Bank Head Office. I have just had a successful show at Parallax Art Fair in Kensington, London.

To see more work, visit victoriaharrisonart.co.uk

Victoria Harrison


 

...


Two Tools You Can Use To Be More Productive

Two Tools You Can Use To Be More Productive

Productivity is activity that positively influences the trajectory of your life whether at home, work, or with personal projects like marketing art. I decided it was time to give you two tools you can use to be more productive, especially considering the many conversations surrounding the age old, “Why don’t I ever get anything done?” or “How the hell did I even get here (without achieving what I set out to achieve)?” 

5 Second Rule

The first tool was developed by Mel Robbins: The ‘5 Second Rule.’ This rule helps you launch into whatever task you need to get done and prevent procrastination. The idea is to count backwards from 5 and move yourself physically towards achieving the task. For example, if you’re struggling to get out of bed, count down from 5 to 1 and physically get yourself out of bed. Or, if you remember something that needs to be done, count down from 5 to 1 and write that task down on your to-do list. The ‘5 Second Rule’ is about helping you make that first move towards being more productive. It creates that forward momentum for yourself.

The Tomato Timer

‘The Tomato Timer’ is another great tool to help you be your most productive self. Traditionally, this tool is about setting a 20 minute timer where zero distractions are allowed. Yep, this means no phone, no Facebook, no cat videos. This means no distractions until you’ve completed the task at hand or the timer has hit 20 minutes. At the end of the 20 minutes, you get a 5 minute break to do whatever you want or need to do and then you go back to 20 minutes of focused work.

I suggest that you get a little more creative with your tomato timer. For example, I had a really long spreadsheet to update – something like 300 rows! So I made an internal agreement with myself. Do 20 lines at a time and take a short break to look at my phone, 20 lines, short break, 20 lines, SHORT break … you get the idea.

For those of you who have lunch breaks, the tomato timer is perfect for you. One day I dedicated 40 minutes of my lunch break to my own personal tasks. The agreement that I created with myself was that if I completed these 40 minutes, I get to take a 20 minute walk.

The tomato timer helps you manage your time because you know you need to complete something within the time allocated. The breaks give you space to fill your time with a sense of reward for your focus. There are even Tomato Timer Apps out there that you can use to assist you! This tool is really helpful during afternoon sluggishness where you end up mindlessly scrolling through Facebook (or mindlessly clicking through windows).

Carlee Myers HeadshotCarlee Myers is the Founder of the Stress Less Company. She is an expert at helping people use art and creativity in order to find their passion again. As a firm believer in creativity, Carlee helps people find their purpose in life through a combination of coaching, creative expression, and experiential activities.

 

 


...


Joe Tantillo [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Joe Tantillo [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Joe Tantillo is a Side Arts Certified Member and award-winning digital artist, photographer, and graphic designer who pursues the creative possibilities of a digital art world and invents new abstract digital animations. His artwork has been exhibited in galleries in the Hudson Valley, where he now lives, and in Manhattan, Connecticut, and Vermont.

His career has spanned many genres including book publishing and graphic design, advertising agency ownership, and being a fine artist and a local Hudson Valley historian. His design studio in New Haven, Connecticut, won 35 national and international awards.

He recently was named a Gold winner in the Abstract Photography category for the Art Folio 2020, forthcoming in January. He is a native of New Paltz, New York, and a graduate of the School of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University.

Creative Career

Over five decades, Joe Tantillo has evolved from following traditional 20th-century mentors drawn from surrealism, the bauhaus movement, and abstract expressionism to creating his own visions of 21st-century conceptualizations. The new possibilities of an art world captured in digital photographic images and the invention of new abstract digital pieces that meld elements of nature with rusting 20th-century classic cars and locomotives and other manmade detritus into original compositions has driven his work even further.

With his expansion into audience interaction and 3D video creations, Joe uses a blend of traditional art and computer software techniques to create unique, non-traditional 21st-century art pieces and animations.

He started his career working as a graphic designer while continuing as an abstract expressionist painter. His graphic design work brought him into the world of digital tools, and he became fluent in Adobe Photoshop from the inception of that software in 1990, later learning how to make 3D fractals and exploring other animation computer programs. In 2000, he began his quest to put these techniques to use in his creative work and turned his attention to landscapes and nature photography. His abstract art with paint and brushes had always been making images from an inward viewpoint— digital nature photography became an opposing counterpoint.

Joe Tantillo

A Dynamic Approach

This dynamic created a search for a merger of both the observed image and the expansion of that image into a new form. Joe achieved this by making abstracts using multiple layers of the photographic images that he’d taken over the past decade and by using computer programs and skills learned as a graphic designer that allowed him to achieve something new, abstract, conceptual and satisfying, which was based in reality but turned into a new and unique form.

The true excitement for Joe Tantillo was creating from a collection of his photos in a direct approach, letting the process drive the final image, a spontaneous process that as he layered and mixed and then added drawing elements, took on something new before his eyes, and that image could then change in a fraction of a second by modifying the image into a new form. As the artist worked, the piece became solidified, and it would suddenly be done.

The melting pot of images would have condensed into the “it” that allowed conscious and unconscious—skill and randomness—to make a new image using 21st-century technology as the only means to attain this. Joe has now turned his attention to animating his concepts and is in the process of creating an installation that is interactive with animation, fractal elements, and midi sound controllers that will make each visit to this installation one of a kind for the participants.

See more work by Joe Tantillo at tantillofineart.com

Joe Tantillo


 

 

...


Researching Calls For Artists

Researching Calls For Artists

Researching calls for artists is an important component of your strategy for marketing art. It is challenging to figure out where to start. Sometimes this can feel overwhelming. To help build your confidence, break down your research into small actionable steps.

Bring The Opportunities To You

Set up Google Alerts for your area. Use this search string: “call for artists” + location. You may also want to include + medium.

For example: “call for artists” + Cleveland + painting

Sign up for niche call for artists platforms. Find them by searching for: “calls for artists” + medium or + style or + relevant topic. Most niche platforms will allow you to narrow your search results to your preferred locations once you sign up.

For example: “calls for artists” + sculpture + “public art” = Americans for the Arts Public Arts Listings

Sign up for newsletters from your area Arts Council and state Arts Commission. These will generally include calls for artists collected from local non-profits.

Dig Deeper For Hidden Gems

Sometimes, when you find a call for artists posted publicly, it has already been filled. It’s important to try to get in front of the process not only to make sure you have to to apply, but also in order to have enough time to create the work or have enough inventory available.

Whenever you find a recurring opportunity, add it to your own spreadsheet. Include the columns: Opportunity, location, deadline, contact information / URL, and a short description. Start checking for the yearly deadline and new information at least six months ahead.

Review call for artists content marketing platforms which offer a range of opportunities, such as Side Arts (our specialty is vetted and trusted call for artists with significant track records of success for artists), Zapplication (juried calls), and Art Fair Insiders (art fair specialists).

Check out their archives and forum sections for information and reviews of calls for artists which align with your goals and interests.

Side Arts only promotes new, active calls for artists – no duplicates.

  • Use the Active category to see current listings.
  • Use the Expired category to see listings which have passed their deadline. Find organizations which offer calls for artists in your area. They may be offering an opportunity, but not promoting it broadly.
  • Use the other categories to refine your search by location, type of call, award amount, and so on.

Researching Calls For Artists Conclusion

Try using free resources to bring the opportunities to your inbox. Join local arts listservs. Create a spreadsheet. Dedicate time once every three months (set up a Google Reminder) to do original research. Make it a SMART goal to add at least three opportunities to your list every month.


...


Call For Artists Providers

Call For Artists Providers

Side Arts provides promotion content marketing for a range of call for artists providers and business types. The most common include art organizations, galleries, event promoters, private businesses, local governments, educational institutes, and museums.

Call For Artists Providers

In order of frequency, these are the types of organizations which provide opportunities for visual artists and crafters:

  1. Galleries – Offer 4-10 exhibition opportunities per year. These are themed calls which can range from colors, shapes, social issues, medium, and styles. The benefit of showing with a gallery is being able to take advantage of their relationships with collectors.
  2. Non-profit art organizations – Offer 2-3 exhibition or competitions per year. The non-profits are typically local arts councils or focused on a specific medium, such as wood, ceramics, or fabric. Exhibition themes revolve around local history, public figures, and community affairs.
  3. Event promoters – Manage annual art fairs. These pay-to-participate events usually include the opportunity for juried prizes. Participation to be juried often costs extra.
  4. Residencies – Destinations for inspired art making which may include travel expenses, room and board, studio space, and guided support and experiences. Residencies may be juried or paid. 1) Juried: There are no costs except application fees. 2) Paid: The participant assumes all costs. These provide different levels of services on a fee-based and availability basis.
  5. Government institutions – Opportunities provided by city government or state arts commissions. These occur irregularly and are dependent on funding. Funding may come from the city, state, federal, or percent-for-art (one-half of one percent of construction cost for art projects). These are requests for proposals for public works – murals, sculptures, traffic box wraps, storm drain painting, bus stop installations, bicycle rack artwork, public bench artwork, and other installations.
  6. Publications – Magazines, both online and in print. Usually pay-to-participate and ongoing based on publication frequency.
  7. Studio tours – Community events where artist studios are open to the public. Run by a local arts council or an independent non-profit organization. Pay-to-participate. Although traffic is not guaranteed, online and print promotion may be offered. The primary benefit is having a reason to clean up and organize the studio annually.
  8. Higher education institutions – These are often residencies which take advantage of a broad range of facilities and services available at the institution as well as dormitory living space.
  9. Private businesses – Commissions from private businesses looking for branding and marketing support – typically murals or 2D artwork in private offices, hotels, and other real estate.

Call For Artists Benefits

Providing each of the above has positive and negative aspects. Make sure the fee structure, commissions, and terms of engagement are clearly defined. Know your legal rights. Give quantitative and qualitative data to back up why someone should participate.


...


Call For Artists Point Of Contact [Write A Call For Artists]

Call For Artists Point Of Contact [Write A Call For Artists]

Providing a point of contact is important when writing a call for artists. Transparency is important to visual artists and crafters. They trust that we hold our clients accountable for their listings. Providing the relevant information helps establish that the client is not a faceless organization or phishing exercise and, in turn, increases response rates.

Calls For Artists Point Of Contact Information

Most promotion content marketing platforms require three point of contact pieces of information.

  • Public point of contact email
  • Email for administrative use
  • Name for administrative use

Public Point Of Contact

Email For Administrative Use

  • Where the promotion content marketing platform can contact the listing’s administrator for questions or concerns about the listing.
  • May be general (art@yourbusiness.com) or specific (jdoe@yourbusiness.com), but preferably specific.
  • The person that manages this email address is often both the person that publishes and promotes the listing, although in the case of some larger organizations, there may be two individuals that divide these responsibilities.
  • Promotion content marketing platforms will send this email address information about their account, listing updates, and information on best practices for marketing the listing.

Name For Administrative Use

  • This is the person that is most responsible for posting listings and managing the promotion content marketing platform’s account.
  • A full name (first and last) is usually required for account set up and maintenance.
  • Although not shown to the public, providing a contact name helps establish transparency and allows to quickly address account issues.

Call For Artists Promotion

...


Listing Content Changes [Write A Call For Artists]

Listing Content Changes [Write A Call For Artists]

It is challenging to write an effective call for artists. There are many details to think through. Side Arts promotion service provides copywriters and content marketers who help you frame your listing and promotion in order to attract the most qualified participants.

Once a call for artists is published to the site, only Side Arts staff can make listing content changes. This is to ensure that our quality assurance process is not compromised.

Obviously, small changes and misunderstandings may occur. Therefore, changes may be requested for incidental updates; i.e. given the wrong link, change of date/location, or point of contact.

Our ability to keep the price manageable is reliant on the work load on our staff copywriters and promoters. Our policy is to have our copywriters format the listings in the best possible way in terms of grammar, online searchability, and current content marketing best practices.

Your social promotion is scheduled when the listing is posted. Changing your content may mean proofing and editing social content, as well.

We want your call for artist to succeed! If you have any questions about your promotions, reach out to us at mail@sidearts.com.


Call For Artists Promotion

...

1 2 3 4 5