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Pricing Your Artwork

Pricing Your Artwork

Pricing your artwork is an important component of your strategy for marketing art. Pricing should not be an over-complicated procedure in the primary market. (Secondary market sales can be much more complicated.) If you are new to pricing your artwork, there is a formula to determine where to start.

Pricing Your Artwork Formula

  1. Start with the total costs of the materials used. Use the relative cost of only the materials used.
  2. Track the amount of time you actually spent creating the artwork.
  3. Multiply the number of hours by the rate you would charge per hour as a professional art consultant.
  4. Add the cost of materials and time.
  5. Multiply the result by a multiple based on your overall experience. This is typically between 2 (just starting out) and 10 (top of your field).

Price of Original Artwork = [Materials + (Time)(Hourly Rate)] (Experience)

For example, [$100 materials + (20 hours of work)($25/hr)] (5 years of experience adds a multiplier of 3) = $1800.

Pricing reproductions

  • Highest quality (limited edition giclee prints or high-end reproductions) = 50% of original price
  • Mid-grade quality (limited edition reproductions) = 30% of original price
  • Low quality (one-off prints or open-ended reproductions) = 10% of original price

 

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Marketing Art: A Fresh Approach [Official Guide]

Marketing Art: A Fresh Approach [Official Guide]

The tactics needed for marketing art and elevating your creative practice are going to be different for every person. A one-size-fits-all guide that runs through the usual art marketing, eCommerce, website, social media, email, legal, and contract strategies may offer helpful components, but isn’t applicable to everyone. This is because artists and crafters come from so many varieties of experience, socioeconomic backgrounds, disabilities, and adversities to overcome. Side Arts helps by providing educational information, listings of opportunities, and a certification, networking, and promotion platform.

Marketing Art: A Fresh Approach

  1. Understand your feelings
  2. Define your motivation
  3. Set positive goals
  4. Develop a process
  5. Scale your efforts
  6. Analyze your results
  7. Network for opportunities

1. Understand Your Feelings

What is common in all artists’ journeys is that you FEEL a certain way about implementing these strategies. This is something that CAN be managed and adapted to having a positive experience with marketing art.

So rather than talking about the latest social media strategy, let’s start talking about how you feel about using social media for your work. Whether you are a digital native or technophobe, your feelings are at the core of how you use platforms to promote your work.

Being a digital native may lend to being over-confident about the potential results. Being a technophobe may undervalue what can be accomplished. It’s best to try to be somewhere in between. Here, it helps to be rational:

  • You don’t know what you can do unless you try.
  • Even the smallest results are a step in the right direction.
  • Be exact and truthful when measuring the results.

The most important step: Before you begin to try something new or view the results of something you have tried, 1) imagine a realistic positive result, 2) remind yourself to accept whatever the results are, and 3) commit to learning something from them. This will help put you in the right mindframe to move into the next positive step forward for your creative practice.

2. Define Your Motivation

The best question you can ask is, “Why?” It’s a question that children learn early. They are relentless with it! Their young minds are processing so much information. Ours are, too, although we often don’t have the patience to work through the reasons. It’s important to keep asking why.

The Five Whys

Ask yourself: Why do you want to sell your work? Then, ask why you gave that response, then ask why again, and again, and again. Ask yourself why five times to get to the heart of the matter. It’s challenging to be that honest with yourself, but you may discover something important that you hadn’t realized before. This can help inform your creative practice in new ways.

The Money Issue

I know. I know. We all want to make money. Some of us more than others, and that’s okay, that’s your right. The important thing to realize is that money is the by-product (rather than the reason for) of a transaction. The transaction is what is important. You have something and someone else sees the value in it. Therefore, the transaction is an item exchanged for validation. How much money is assigned to that validation is an abstract.

What Is Your Motivation?

Ask yourself: What do you have to offer and what type of validation are you seeking? It is important to know the answers to these questions so that you know what and when you have accomplished something. You’ll be able to definitely state your accomplishments.

3. Set Positive Goals

Goals are important because they help you understand the work you have accomplished and provide direction for your next steps. How often have you said to yourself, “I just don’t know what to do next?!” The first step in answering that question is looking back to what you have already done.

Try making a list first. Break the list into two columns. One column for things you have tried which have worked and another column for things that haven’t worked or yielded any results. Put this list somewhere you can see it every day. Make a commitment to stop doing things that you know don’t work and start doing more of what is working.

SMART Goals

SMART goals are defined as Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. Focus first on things that are working (80% of your time) and then on new things that you have not tried before (20% of your time).

Examples:

  • Send out two email newsletters within the next four weeks. Try Madmimi, Mailchimp, or Constant Contact. Focus each on a new piece of work with a description and call to action to purchase.
  • Sign up for a social media platform which you are not currently using (i.e. Tiktok). Post four pieces of content within the next week and measure engagement.
  • Review your Google Analytics account for your website. Identify the pages which have the most visits. Update and/or republish these pages with new or additional content within the next week.
  • Increase your email list by 20% in the next 6 months.
  • Increase your sales by 10% in the next 3 months.

Projected and Stretch Goals

For each goal (and you may only want to try one at a time), set a projected and stretch goal.

Projected goals are those based on past data. For example, if you normally attain 5 new facebook followers a month, try changing how and when you post and see if you get 7 new followers each month for the next few months.

Stretch goals go beyond your projections, but not too far! Using the same example as above, try for 10 new followers per month.

Compare Yourself To Yourself

It’s easy to look at others with massive followings and sales and become discouraged. Try to remind yourself that they started out with 0 followers at one point. Rather than comparing yourself to others, look at what you have been able to accomplish. You might be surprised that the difference in results from this year to last are extraordinary compared to the results from five years ago.

Remember to celebrate the small victories. They add up! This might be a good opportunity to spend some time checking your feelings. Review what you have accomplished so far and how they relate to your motivation. Update your list of things you have tried. Having trouble getting motivated? Try these productivity tools.

4. Develop A Process

There is no set path for marketing art as a visual artist or crafter, but there is a standard journey for customers. For the purpose of this guide customers may be clients, patrons, buyers, gallerists, curators, commissioners, and so on.

Attract, Engage, Delight

To attract an audience, you’ll need to put yourself where they are. Everyone consumes information differently and has preferences as to how they want to be contacted. Most are best reached by email. But before you get their email address, you may need to put content out on SnapChat, Instagram, YouTube, or your own website.

Go where you think your audience is. If you paint, go where people expect paintings. If your paintings are about environmental issues, go where people expect to talk about environmental issues. Think broadly about your audience and their various preferences.

Engage with your audience. Educate them about why you do what you do and how you do it. This is more than a picture and one word description. There are so many ways to engage with your audience. Make a list of feels most authentic to you and narrow that list down to three to five items. Use these consistently.

Artist engagement

  • Show works in progress step by step
  • Write a story and rationale for each piece made
  • Do product reviews and demonstrations
  • Film short videos of works of progress
  • Studio selfies!
  • Provide lifestyle stories, tell who you are outside the studio

Give your audience a delight that will have them sharing the experience with their friends. This may include:

  • Personalized notes with each purchase
  • Mini-print contests
  • Fan appreciation give-aways
  • Take your packaging to the next level
  • Thank customers for at-home pictures of your work

Engagement Funnel

All of the above components fit within a art marketing engagement funnel. Think of it as a big letter “V” where the top is how customers find out about you and the bottom is making a sale. Not everyone gets all the way through the funnel. It is important that the top of the funnel is continuously fed with new people. Most funnels are structured from top to bottom like this:

  • Social media – introduction
  • Website – education
  • Email – owned communication channel
  • Purchase – validation

Once someone has gone through the funnel, they are likely to go through again. Encourage the process by acquiring testimonials and referrals. This provides additional content to promote and new people being fed into the top.

5. Scale Your Efforts

Once you know what is working, there are a number of ways in which you can increase your marketing art momentum. You may want to try repurposing content, paid media ads, and alternate art sales channels.

Repurpose content

Take the communication you have already developed and repackage it in a new way. These can be used for both engagement initiatives and value add sales applications.

  • Create an ebook or art book out of your works in progress and final exhibit / at home images.
  • Teach a class about your process
  • Offer an instructional manual
  • Offer special commissions based on current works
  • Create monthly patron or student webinars
  • Launch a podcast series (limited or on-going)

The key to success is using information and content that you already have with an established audience. They are likely to share with their networks and increase your visibility.

Paid media ads

Ads are most effective when they promote content that is already successful. Always point ads to your educational materials, rather than at a sales page. In turn, the educational material should offer a call to action that leads to your sales page. One way to think about this: “you have to ask me out on a date before you ask me to marry you.”

Value Add Applications For Marketing Art

You can obtain more information that informs your strategy of marketing art by participating in a variety of events. Getting live interaction directly from the source provides the best feedback. Remember that it is not just what they say, but what they do and how they do it that is important to recognize.

Other than direct art sales, consider participating in:

  • Requests for proposals
  • Grants
  • Vendor events
  • Platform sales
  • Licensing
  • Exhibitions
  • Competition

Click here for more information on each of the art sales channels. You won’t know what works best unless you give it a try. Do what is best for your creative practice, time, budget, and community.

6. Analyze Your Results

Take a break, at least once a month, to look at some of the data you have gathered. You may learn something new about what works, when to do something, and who to focus on. It’s easy to look at the data and move on, but it’s more important to make a commitment to make the small changes it suggests.

If you have your own website, set up Google Analytics. It will help you understand what pages get the most traffic and where the traffic comes from. You can determine which pages to target for ads and which sources generate more leads.

Almost all social media platforms offer some analytic data on your account. On these accounts, it’s most important to make adjustments in terms of who is visiting and when.

When using email marketing platforms, like MadMimi, Mailchimp, and Constant Contact, keep track of how many people are on your list, what percent open your emails, and what percent click through from content in your emails to your links. Change the content and / or formatting of your emails based on the highest open and click through rates.

Remember to look back on data from a year or more back to see how much your creative practice has grown. Take a moment to reflect on how you feel about these changes. Are you comfortable with what you have done? Do you feel you need to be more proactive? It might be time to revisit your SMART goals, both projected and stretch. What, if anything, do you want to do differently? Make a commitment, write it down, and plan your changes.

7. Network For Opportunities

If you want your strategy for marketing art to elevate to the next level, then network for opportunities. Many artists have similar opportunities when it comes to setting up their creative practice. There are free website hosting services and website templates, social media platforms with analytics, Google Analytics data, Google suite for managing content, and scalable email marketing platforms. All of these are available and mostly accessible to artists and crafters equally.

Personal networks are unique to each individual. These relationships should be fostered with care. There are many ways to do so.

  • Collect email addresses from anyone that seems interested in your art.
  • Connect with your contacts on LinkedIn
  • Search for and connect with 2nd degree connections on LinkedIn that may have similar interests
  • Volunteer at trade shows, exhibitions, and art and craft fairs
  • Join a professional association in your field of interest
  • Attend Meet-ups
  • Get Certified with Side Arts and join your local artist registries

Have a few high net worth contacts already? Ask them out for coffee once every six months. Set up a recurring reminder on Google calendar for each individual. Keep a few personal notes on each contact. Besides art, what are their other personal interests? You’ll have some easy talking points for each conversation. Ask how you can help them before asking for help yourself.

Marketing Art Strategy Conclusion

Try thinking about your strategy for marketing art as a process of deliberate practice. It’s not about doing the same thing on repeat, but understanding your feelings and motivations, focusing on SMART Goals, and making adaptations. That hard thing is sticking with something that may feel uncomfortable at first or making a change the data supports which goes against your preconceived notions. Small steps first.


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Linda Dubin Garfield [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Linda Dubin Garfield [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Linda Dubin Garfield is a Side Arts Certified Member and award-winning printmaker and mixed media artist, creates visual memoirs exploring the mystery of memory and the magic of place, using hand-pulled printmaking techniques, photography, collage, and digital imaging. Her abstract and dynamic works use multiple layers of ink that waver between background and foreground creating a fusion of surface design and abstract expressionism. She creates installations that include public participatory art, especially when she is exploring themes relating to women in today’s culture.

In 2005, she founded ARTsisters, a group of professional artists who empower each other and their community through art. In 2007, she started smART business consulting, helping emerging artists reach their goals and their audience, providing consulting and coaching on the business side of art through individual, small groups, and workshop experiences as well as providing opportunities to exhibit work. Today, she serves on several non-profit boards and appreciates her good fortune to be able to make art every chance she gets.

Linda Dubin Garfield

Linda Dubin Garfield Artist’s Statement

In the early 90’s, I took a printmaking course and fell in love with the process. Unlike other passionate relationships that fade with time, the passion and love I have for printmaking has only gotten more intense. Several years ago, I started exploring mixed media and have found that combining collage and monotype is another relationship that works for me. I also enjoy combining photography and digital imaging with traditional printmaking techniques. The process leads to rich palimpsests using a vocabulary of shapes and motifs. My use of traditional printmaking techniques combined with experimental approaches is a means of expanding my visual language. The possibilities are exponential.

Nature nurtures and inspires me. I combine elements of nature, texture and design along with the magic of the press. I am intrigued by memory and what remains in our mind’s eye. My work reflects scenes from travel near and far. More than a report on how it was exactly, I am interested in my expressive and passionate response to the color and pattern of the landscape, experience or image. The fluid space of memory, influenced by time, place and experience, forms the foundation of content for my work. I merge aspects of experience and observations with imagined and remembered sensations to create non-objective work that reflects life and memory. My work has overlapping layers of color and space, shifting relationships with mark-making that includes monotype, silkscreen, stencil, image transfer as well as drawing. Inspired by travel, I am creating visual memoirs that offer multiple meanings to the viewer.

My focus on the process, not the outcome, frees me to be experimental. Following my passion and living my dream energizes me to be productive and alive. I feel like I am now living out loud. I want to share that passion and joie de vivre with those seeing my work, triggering a memory or experience for the viewer.

See more of her work at lindadubingarfield.com.

Linda Dubin Garfield


 

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Calls For Artists As Sales Channels

Calls For Artists As Sales Channels

Calls for artists are indirect sales channels for your artwork. How frequently do you apply to calls for artists and for what type do you typically apply? Where have you had the most success in generating the most margin on sales?

Side Arts can help. Learn more with our official guide, Marketing Art: A Fresh Approach.

Calls for artists include

  • Requests for proposals – Commissions for your artwork
  • Grants – Funds that are available for the completion of a project or growth of a practice
  • Vendor events – Sell your own artwork at a rental space
  • Exhibition opportunities – Agents sell your artwork at a relatively high commission.
  • Competitions – Compete with others for a limited number of prizes

It is helpful to think of them in terms of both direct and indirect sales channels as they relate to the margin on your artwork. In other words, where do you get the most money relative to your efforts.

Margin By Sales Channels

Sales Channels

 

In direct sales, requests for proposals, and grants, you are typically setting the terms of engagement. You know the inputs and there are limited outputs.

Vendor events rank slightly lower. This is because you shoulder the costs of the booth rental fee. More importantly, it introduces more variables that are outside your control such as rain, advertising for the event, traffic flow, and so on.

Likewise, platform sales, such as Etsy and EBay introduce flat and variable fees for including your work on their sites. Although they offer extra promotion services, they come at a hefty price. Therefore, promotion, which costs time and money, is on you.

When utilizing licencing, the burden of promotion is now on the vendor to whom you have licenced your work. Since they do all the promotion, they take a much higher commission which reduces your margin considerably.

Exhibitions work the same way as licencing. The burden of promotion and sales is on the gallerist or curator hosting the exhibition. If they are not offering promotion and sales support, then it is simply a pay-for-play vendor event. The purpose of participating in an exhibition is to take advantage of the organization’s exclusive buyer’s lists which should align with the type of work you offer.

Lastly, competitions offer the greatest risk and least margin for your time and effort. You have no control as to how many others are participating, there may be a fee to participate, and there may only be one winner.

Conclusion

Before applying for a call for artists, think through how best it fits with your goals and the risk you are willing to take. Make sure you know quantitative answers to questions regarding promotion, buyer’s lists, and commission percentages.

Most artists looking to grow their professional network and sales opportunities apply to 10-15 calls for artists per year. The average cost of applying is $25-45.

Looking to lower the cost of applications? Side Arts Member Certification may be right for you. Certified Members whom are selected for opportunities promoted on Side Arts are eligible to be reimbursed that calls’ application fees. Click here to learn more.


 

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Call For Artists Application Questions [What To Include]

Call For Artists Application Questions [What To Include]

When looking to promote your call for artists, it should include all relevant information needed for an artist to decide whether to apply for your opportunity as well as for you to make an informed selection. The call for artists application is how artists send their information to you, whether it is for an exhibition, vendor event, competition, request for proposal, or grant.

Applications should use webforms with the ability to upload images. Applications by email, mail, or in-person are difficult to track and often have inconsistent entries. Many types of webforms are free. There are several reasonably priced online juried application management services available.

We recommend webform providers such as Jotform and Gravity Forms due to their simplicity and affordability. Depending on your needs, you may also consider using Wufoo or WESTAF’s CaFE or Zapplication.

Basic Application Questions

  • Name
  • Email
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • Website
  • Artwork medium(s)
  • Artwork description
  • Artwork size
  • Price per piece (generally)
  • Image uploads (minimum of three)

Specific Call For Artists Questions

In order to better qualify your applicants, we recommend adding additional quantitative and qualitative fields (not all of which are relevant to every opportunity)

  • Keywords that describe your artwork (up to five)
  • Demographics (if they relate to the opportunity)
  • Facebook page
  • Facebook number of fans
  • Instagram account
  • Instagram number of followers
  • Total number of people in the artists’ email list
  • eCommerce websites (i.e. etsy, zazzle, and so on)
  • Business name (if applicable and incorporated)
  • Press coverage (two or three links)
  • Resume (showing work within the last three to ten years)
  • Are you exclusively represented by a gallery/agent (No/Yes, if so who)
  • Any needs to accommodate for special circumstances
  • How did you find out about the opportunity?
  • In what public art opportunities have you participated?
  • Include mock-ups, if applicable

Keep your application questions short and concise. Start with the easy name, address, and demographics questions, then move on to the questions which are specific to the opportunity. Remember to add a note that describes what happens after the application has been submitted so applicants understand the process.

Looking for more writing tips? Check out our official guide, How To Write A Call For Artists.


Call For Artists Promotion

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The Best Way To Frame Your Call For Artists’ Call To Action

The Best Way To Frame Your Call For Artists’ Call To Action

Call for artists are most effective when they include a single call to action.  A call to action is what you want an artist or crafter to do. It can include clicking a link, opening a document, looking at a picture, leaving a comment, and so on.

Side Arts includes a call to action after the first paragraph of text in each call for artists promotion.

Having clear language, consistent wording, and uncluttered formatting encourages qualified artists to apply.

  • Clear language helps the reader understand what you want them to do. Be direct. For example, “Click here to apply”
  • Use consistent working. Avoid flipping between application, registration, order form, and so on.
  • Uncluttered formatting draws the readers eye to what you want them to do. Avoid small links which may be easy to miss.

Call To Action Formatting Tips

The best format is a single hyperlink to an application near the top of the page. Buttons and alternate text formatting/colors are helpful as well.

This has proven to be the clearest format and most effective for attracting qualified applicants.  Digital application links are preferred over email addresses because they streamline the process for the applicant and client.

There are many good reasons for doing so:

  • A consistent format allows participants to become more comfortable which increases application rates of qualified artists.
  • Click-through rates can be tracked, proving effectiveness.
  • Unique content creation optimizes Google ranking and SEO, adding to a listing’s visibility.

Looking for more tips, check out our official guide, How To Write A Call For Artists.


Call For Artists Promotion

 

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How To Write A Call For Artists [The Only Guide You’ll Ever Need]

How To Write A Call For Artists [The Only Guide You’ll Ever Need]

The most important thing to keep in mind when writing and promoting a call for artists is to be clear, concise, and provide facts and other quantitative data. Artists want to know the specific benefits they receive from participating in the opportunity.

How to Write a Call For Artists

  1. Plan your calls for artists in advance
  2. Plan your promotion strategy
  3. Name your opportunity
  4. Decide on tense and readability
  5. Describe the opportunity
  6. Provide benefits
  7. Make the call to action clear
  8. Add an image
  9. Provide contact information
  10. Add supplemental materials

1. Plan Your Calls For Artists In Advance

There are a number of questions you may want to think about before launching a call for artists. What is the purpose of your call for artists? Who is your audience? What do you want to achieve? Where will it be held? When will it be? What are the associated costs?

More calls for artists are promoted in January and February than in any other months. If you have any downtime over the holidays, then it is a good idea to start drafting your new listings.

Have you planned your call for artists schedule for the year? Think about how many you will offer, when, and what themes. Try creating a content calendar to plan out your promotion strategy.

Calls for artists typically include:

  • Exhibitions – artwork shows featuring selected artists
  • Competitions – awards for themed art contests
  • Vendor events – art fairs and craft shows
  • Residencies – remote live-in spaces for creating art
  • Requests for proposals – paid art projects

2. Plan Your Promotion Strategy

We recommend announcing and publishing your calls for artists between three months and one month in advance of the deadline. Artists will apply either right away or last minute, giving them enough time to think it through is critical. Posting at least one month in advance is beneficial for your online presence. Over three months, your listing will be indexed by Google and given the necessary time for your followers to share and repost.

Plan to make announcements on other channels between the first announcement and the deadline. Artists find out about opportunities through a variety of channels and are often loyal to only one or two. It is important to pace out the announcements. That way, you are receiving a regular influx of new participants over a period of time. Make one more push through each channel during the last four weeks to catch the stragglers.

There are some exceptions when you may want to announce and publish a year in advance. These include residencies that require substantial planning prior to participating and popular annual events which fill far in advance.

3. Name Your Opportunity

A description of the opportunity should be in the name. Avoid generic names like, “Call for artists,” “juried exhibition,” and “art fair.” Add information about the theme or topic. This helps participants self select into applying.

4. Decide On Tense and Readability

When publishing on your own website, use first person tense. For example, “We’re excited to announce this year’s art fair!”

If you are issuing a press release or submitting content for promotion on a third party site, then use third person tense. When published on other’s sites, then it will appear that that service, rather than your organization, is providing the opportunity. Although we would love to take credit for all your hard work, it’s best that it stay with you!

Try to avoid having duplicate information in the listing. It is more important to include more information than you think is necessary than less. The more well-thought out the listing seems to the artist, the more likely it is that they will click through and apply.

When publishing on third party sites, provide unique information about the opportunity. Rephrase the copy for your listing if the same phrasing is used elsewhere online. Unique copy increases the likelihood that your opportunity will appear in search results. Duplicate copy on multiple websites lowers how often it is shown.

5. Describe the Opportunity

Include the location (city, state, and/or country) and reach (local, regional, national) of your call for artists in the first paragraph of the call for artists description. Artists tend to quickly assess whether the call is relevant to them. If not readily apparent, they often click away rather than scroll and read more. For improved search visibility, it is important to have this information in the body of the copy, the tags, and the site’s taxonomy.

In describing the call for artists opportunity or your organization, be cautious of using “fluffy” language. Avoid adjectives such as best, only, or unique. Although it may seem that way locally or even regionally, it is rare that something stands out as exemplary. For example, “the only competition which involves color,” “more exposure than any other,” and “highest sales.”

If the opportunity does stand out, try giving specific facts such as, “Over 10000 visitors over the course of the weekend,” “reported average art sales of $2000,” and “awarded top fair by So-and-so Magazine.” Be specific.

If it is a juried event, list the jurors, their titles, and provide bios. Unless a requirement by the juror, keep the bios short – a few sentences at most. Participants don’t require a full life history, every school attended, award earned, and show list.

Use a bulletted list for the timeline. Consider the following items:

  • Application open
  • Deadline
  • Delivery date
  • Jury date
  •  Opening
  • Closing
  • Receptions
  • Pick up date

Decide on the list of questions in the application.

Promote Your Call For Artists

6. Provide Benefits

This is the most important part of your listing. Use quantitative, rather than qualitative descriptors. Most importantyly, remember that “exposure” is not a benefit. Consider the following questions when listing your opportunity’s benefits (not all will apply):

  • Break down the list of the awards and how they will be judged.
  • What makes your audience unique? (demographics, income, interests)
  • What is the break-down of the prizes?
  • How many social followers do you have? What is the distribution of your mailers?
  • What is the average buy from an opening reception/over a month’s time?
  • Average foot / web traffic over a month?
  • Do you partner with any other organizations to increase traffic?
  • What other events in the area are occurring during the exhibition month which may increase traffic (and by how much)?
  • Are there any notable attendees?
  • Who is your collector base and how large (who are your established VIPs and do they receive a preview)?
  • What do you do to follow up with the artists after the exhibition?
  • What’s your customer/client service model?
  • Do you offer additional services to the participant while they are participating?

7. Make The Call To Action Clear

The call to action is what you want a reader to do. Often, this appears in the form of submitting an application or registering for an event. When submitting the link to the application / registration page, provide the most direct URL. Provide a direct link even if it is not to your website, for example to a Google Form, CaFE, or other form site. The more links the artists have to click to get through to get to the application process, the fewer artists will apply. Side Arts will include a link to your website in the listing under the about section.

Make sure your application / registration landing page is up to date. Check that the links work and all the dates are correct. It’s a good time to check that all your social links are working, too!

8. Add an Image

Upload a unique image for the opportunity, one that is not published elsewhere on the web. It should be at least 500×500 in order to be scaled correctly for social media. Use jpgs and pngs. Direct facing, smiling people work best. Location shots are good, too. If there are text overlays, keep the words as few as possible and avoid crowding the image. Do not use organizational logos for the image. You may want to use multiple images to break up the copy if the listing has many details.

9. Provide Contact Information

At minimum, provide a direct contact’s full name and direct email address. Preferably, use an email of a person rather than a general organizational email such as info@ or contact@. Listings with a person’s email address has a 20% higher click-through and application rate. It provides transparency, accountability, and shows a willingness to respond to questions. For the artist, this builds trust.

Provide information about the organization which is hosting the opportunity. This is usually copied from the organization’s about page. Remember to list any supporting or sponsoring organizations, especially if it is a requirement of the sponsorship.

10. Add Supplemental Materials

Depending on the type of opportunity, there are a range of other details that may need to be addressed. These include:

  • Application fee structure and reasoning
  • Commission structure
  • Location maps and images
  • Legal considerations

Conclusion

How to write a call for artists? Take your time. Check for grammar and spelling errors. Look up other similar calls for artists for ideas. There is no such thing as a perfect listing. You’ll learn more and develop a process as you do more. Remember that Side Arts’ copywriters are here to help! Our expert team of content marketers can help you craft your listing.


Call For Artists

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Nancy Staub Laughlin [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Nancy Staub Laughlin [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Nancy Staub Laughlin is a new Certified Member on Side Arts. She is an accomplished, New Jersey based artist, and has created a new concept of the “still life” working with pastels on paper and photography. Nancy’s newest series, which she refers to as “assemblages,” incorporates the photograph into the pastel drawing. These dynamic, layered, juxtaposing assemblages allow the viewer to enter her world of color, light, dimension, and beauty from a different perspective.

Nancy’s compelling compositions are the culmination of many carefully executed steps that define her unique creative process. For Laughlin, the artistic journey offers an almost limitless exploration of the possibilities of artistic creation, allowing her to enter the unreal world in which she has created.

Her most memorable highlight was being reviewed by Sam Hunter, Art Critic and Historian of Modern and Contemporary Art who found her work “refreshingly unique”. This has been a common theme among many of her positive reviews. She offers a “different” approach and passion to drawing. Nancy is consistent in her vision…one can always recognize her signature style no matter how much she has changed or grown.

See more of her work at nancystaublaughlin.com

Nancy Staub Laughlin2

Nancy Staub Laughlin3


 

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Kelly Anderson [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Kelly Anderson [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Kelly Anderson is a Certified Member on Side Arts.

Art for me started my junior year of high school. 3 years later I obtained a Associates of Applied Science degree in Graphic Design December of 1999. I worked in the field for a year designing pattern pieces for cold air inflatables before returning to college to graduate with a Bachelors of Applied Science degree in Graphic design June 2003.

After a kid, a marriage, and another kid on the way my husband and I started an art business. We built it over 10 years. Every opportunity allowed us to give back more.

My mixed media images depict feelings that everyone encounters at some point in their life. The crayon ties in those childlike feelings of safety and comfort. I use other items to tie in the meaning. I include a dictionary cutout relevant to the overall theme so one can visualize the emotions. Most of all it adds a personal touch.

Each image has its own story as a handwritten message that is sealed for one person’s eyes.

See more of her work at https://crayonkelly.com/


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Linda Fitzgerald [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Linda Fitzgerald [Certified Member – Side Arts]

Linda Fitzgerald is a new Certified Member on Side Arts. She was born in the Hudson Valley area of New York State, and has been a Fort Collins, CO, resident since 1988. Before settling in Colorado, Linda’s path took her to the San Francisco Bay area and to Santa Fe, NM, where her passion for both visual and culinary art began to blossom.

In San Francisco, Linda befriended nationally acclaimed sculptress, Ruth Cravath Wakefield and fine art painter, Charles Farr, both of whom inspired and influenced Linda on her creative journey.

In 1978, Linda moved to New Mexico. She had the honor of working as a “Companion/Chef” for Georgia O’Keeffe at Ms. O’Keeffe’s Abiquiu home.

 

Linda Fitzgerald

Linda Fitzgerald

 

See more of her work at lindafitzgeraldgalleryandgifts.com


 

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