Side Arts | Blog

Site Updates – October 2015

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SideArts community,

This month, we introduce:

  • Improved customer service support – use the question mark in the lower right to send questions and make suggestions.
  • Updated Emerging and Professional-level artist icons on profiles
  • Updated and clearer member sign-up page.

What’s coming soon?

  • Automated billing reminders.
  • Text alerts for professional users.

We do our best to test all updates prior to going live, but sometimes bugs slip past us.  If you see any errors or have any suggestions, report them to mail@sidearts.com (or use the new customer service widget).

Thank you for your ongoing support.

-Todd and the SideArts team

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Site Updates – September 2015

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SideArts community,

We’ve been hard at work making some big improvements. This month, we introduce:

  • Version one of our responsive mobile site. Browse our listings much easier on your mobile device and tablets.
  • New 6 month and yearly professional membership levels. Save time and receive fewer emails by upgrading beyond the monthly account. Save money using the discounted price for the yearly account.

What’s coming soon?

  • Improved customer service support.
  • Automated billing reminders.
  • Text alerts for professional users.

We do our best to test all updates prior to going live, but sometimes bugs slip past us.  If you see any errors or have any suggestions, report them to mail@sidearts.com.

Thank you for your ongoing support.

-Todd and the SideArts team

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Site Updates – Summer 2015

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SideArts community,

This summer we have been focused on improving security for our users. Although not as noticeable on the outside, we have been updating many of our security features to protect our artist and business users. These periodic updates ensures that your data is safe with us.

What’s coming soon?

  • Enabled responsive mobile functionality.
  • Updated email alert features for premium members.
  • Adding yearly and two year subscription options for artists.

We do our best to test all updates prior to going live, but sometimes bugs slip past us.  If you see any errors or have any suggestions, report them to mail@sidearts.com.

Thank you for your ongoing support.

-Todd and the SideArts team

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What types of businesses does SideArts serve?

SideArts serves a range of business types. The most common include art organizations, art galleries, event promoters, private businesses, local governments, educational institutes, and museums.

What is a business?

  • Prior to generating revenue, an entity is considered a hobby.
  • Once an entity has generated revenue, it is considered a business.

In the USA, revenue can be described a number of ways including fees from sales, memberships, donations, gift monies, financial investments, and more.

Depending on your local government, how much revenue generated will determine when your business should be incorporated. For example: In 2015 in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, an entity must incorporate if it generates more than $600US dollars in a fiscal year.

(There are other ways of filing taxes and deductions as an individual, but we won’t get into those details here.)

Businesses may choose to file their articles of incorporation in any number of ways. This is primarily done in order to take advantage of different tax and liability laws. In the USA, popular incorporation types include S-Corps, C-Corps, B-Corps, LLCs, Sole Proprietorships, Partnerships, Limited Partnerships, and 501(c)3s. Outside the USA, there are many more types of incorporation types available.

What type of entity your business is incorporated as will determine whether it is for-profit or non-profit. An apt comparison is that a non-profit organization is to a business as a red apple is to a fruit.

Non-profit type entities were wildly popular in the USA during the 80’s and 90’s, although new formations have become discouraged by investors and philanthropists due to their high rate of unsustainability. The more popular B-Corps have taken their place in preference of the structure’s focus on triple-bottom lines.

Now you know more about corporate structures. Easy-peasy!

Learn more best practices for calls for artists at our FAQ page.

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Who to include as your listing’s point of contact

Side Arts listings require information in order to process your listing. Each answer is important in terms of making sure you get the most out of your listing.

Transparency is important to our artist members. They trust that we hold our clients accountable for their listings. Providing the most relevant information proves that the client is not just a faceless organization or phishing exercise and, in turn, increases response rates.

Each listing requires

  • Public point-of-contact email
  • Email for administrative use
  • Name for administrative use

Public point-of-contact

Email for administrative use

  • Where SideArts staff can contact the listings administrator for questions or concerns about the listing.
  • May be general (art@yourbusiness.com) or specific (jdoe@yourbusiness.com), but preferably specific.
  • The person that manages this email address is often both the person that posts and markets the listing, although in the case of some larger organizations, there may be two individuals that divide these responsibilities.
  • SideArts will send this email address information about their account, listing updates, and information on best practices for marketing the listing.

Name for administrative use

  • This is the person that is most responsible for posting listings and managing the client’s SideArts account.
  • A full name (first and last) is required for account set up and maintenance.
  • Although not shown to our artist members, providing a contact name proves transparency and helps to address quickly any account issues.

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Can I make changes to my listing?

Listings may be edited only for incidental changes; i.e. given the wrong link, change of date/location, or point of contact.

Our ability to keep the price manageable is reliant on the work load on our staff copyrighters and programmers. Our policy is to have our copywriters format the listings in the best possible way in terms of grammar, online searchability, and current content marketing best practices.

Your social promotion for your content is scheduled when the listing is posted. Changing your content may also mean proofing and editing social content.

Online content marketing standards change frequently and we will keep you informed of important changes. To that end, we provide clients with industry standard best practice guides and updates regularly on our blog and FAQ pages.

You may request minor changes for our staff to review if there is something critical you feel is necessary.

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Artwork Pricing Basics

Pricing your artwork should not be an over-complicated procedure. There is a relatively easy formula to determine where to start. After you have made an estimate, check with your peer artists to see if you are within the standards for your type of artwork.

  1. Start with the total costs of the materials used. Use the relative cost of only the materials used.
  2. Track the amount of time you actually spent creating the artwork.
  3. Multiply the number of hours by the rate you would charge per hour as a professional art consultant commensurate with your number of years of experience.
  4. Add the cost of materials and time.
  5. Multiply the result by a multiple based on your overall experience. This is typically between 2 (just starting out) and 5 (top of your field).

Price of Original Artwork = [Materials + (Time)(Hourly Rate)](Experience)

For derivative works:

  • Highest quality (giclee prints or high-end reproductions) = 50% of original price
  • Mid-grade quality (limited edition reproductions) = 30% of original price
  • Low quality (one-off prints or reproductions) = 15% of original price

What formula do you use to price your artwork? Help other artists by answering in the comments below.

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What is a call for artists?

Calls for artists are indirect sales channels for your artwork.  They can include:

  • Requests for proposals – Commissions for your artwork
  • Grants – Funds that are available for the completion of a project or growth of a practice
  • Vendor events – Sell your own artwork at a rental space
  • Exhibition opportunities – Agents sell your artwork at a relatively high commission.
  • Competitions – Compete with others for a limited number of prizes

It is helpful to think of them in terms of both direct and indirect sales channels as they relate to the margin on your artwork.

Sales Channels

 

How frequently do you apply to calls for artists and for what type do you typically apply? Where have you had the most success in generating the most margin on sales? Help other artists by answering in the comments below.

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Site Updates – February 2015

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SideArts community,

This month we made a few major improvements for both our artist members and business clients.

  • For artists: Search preferences can now be saved including the ability to receive immediate, daily, weekly, or monthly digests of listings that correspond to your searches. Premium artist members can now receive only the listings you need!
  • For businesses: Listings can now be entered and payment made in one place. This saves you the wait of payment confirmation and receiving the input form.

What’s coming soon?

  • Improved artist membership management feature with easier credit card updating and invoice reviewing.
  • Enabled responsive mobile functionality.
  • Updated search functionality for artist profiles.

We do our best to test all updates prior to going live, but sometimes bugs slip past us.  If you see any errors or have any suggestions, report them to mail@sidearts.com.

Thank you for your ongoing support.

-Todd and the SideArts team

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What you should include in your call for artist application

Your call for artist listing should include all relevant information needed for an artist to decide whether to apply for your opportunity. The call for artists application is how artists send their information to you, whether it is for an exhibition, vendor event, competition, RFP, or grant.

Applications should always be webforms including image uploads. Applications by email, mail, or in-person are highly discouraged. Many types of webforms are free and there are several reasonably priced online juried application management services available.

Our recommended webform providers are Jotform and Gravity Forms due to their simplicity and affordability. Depending on your needs, you may also consider using Wufoo, Wooloo, or any of the WESTAF services including CaFE, Zapplication, or YouJudgeIt.

A simple application should include the following fields:

  • Name
  • Email
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • Website
  • Artwork medium(s)
  • Artwork description
  • Artwork size
  • Price per piece (generally)
  • Image uploads (minimum of three)

In order to better qualify your applicants, we recommend adding additional quantitative and qualitative fields (not all of which are relevant to every opportunity):

  • Keywords that describe your artwork (up to five)
  • Facebook page
  • Facebook number of fans
  • Twitter account
  • Twitter number of followers
  • Instagram account
  • Instagram number of followers
  • Total number of people in the artists’ email list
  • Other websites (i.e. etsy, zazzle, and so on)
  • Business name (if applicable and incorporated)
  • Revenue from art sales in past twelve months
  • Press coverage (two or three links)
  • Resume
  • Are you exclusively represented by a gallery/agent (No/Yes, if so who)
  • Any needs to accommodate for special circumstances.
  • How did you find out about this call for artists?

You may have other questions included typically in your call for artists applications. Use the comments section below to tell us what and why.

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